Industry tips #7 – Developing world aid and the media

1 04 2011

By Dale Sean McEwan

Picture courtesy of frontlineblogger

London’s Frontline Journalism Club held a talk on January 25 this year on the subject of aid and the media.

In the words of the Frontline Club, “the talk exams the often troubled relationship between the media and aid agencies. With an expert panel we will be discussing how the media and aid agencies work together and the problems that arise.

“Extensive humanitarian disasters attract a large amount of media attention whilst smaller and on going disasters often go unreported. Should the media be more receptive to aid agencies that try to bring attention to these causes? Or should aid agencies be more PR driven and utilise new media in order to attract the media spotlight?”

The event was chaired by Mark Galloway, director of the International Broadcasting Trust, an educational and media charity which works on a range of projects to promote media coverage of the developing world.

Also on the panel were:

Andrew Hogg, Christian Aid news/campaigns editor and former news editor of the Sunday Times and Observer and was editor of The Sunday Times Insight investigative unit.

Benjamin Chesterton, radio documentary and photofilm producer, co-founder of the production company duckrabbit and the website A Developing Story.

Fran Unsworth, head of BBC newsgathering.

Michael Green, an independent writer and consultant who was director of communications at DFID from 2003 to 2007 and co-author of Philanthrocapitalism and The Road From Ruin.

Here’s a link to the video: http://www.viddler.com/player/f0c64fb8/

Advertisements




Industry tips #6 – Freelance video journalist Democratic Republic of Congo

1 04 2011

By Dale Sean McEwan

Video about Claudel’s background.

Video about Claudel’s arrival in London.

Claudel filming interviews of rape victims for Human Rights Watch.





Another date for the diary

31 03 2011

Getting lots of hits to your video uploads is easier said than done. You might have created a masterpiece of video journalism, but you’re not sure what to do with it to maximise it’s effect. But help is at hand!

If you want to be part of the new wave of online creators and if you want to discover how to successfully create, distribute and earn money from your videos on YouTube, the following event is for you.

The first ever European YouTube Partnerships event dedicated to producers, directors, writers, artists, video and media professionals of the future is coming up and it promises to provide some valuable advice and tips to make you and your videos stand out and even make cash by sharing advertising revenue.

YouTube, in partnership with British Film Institute (BFI), on 14th April, are holding a “Becoming YouTube Stars” event at Ravensbourne College.

Spaces are strictly limited so you’ll need register.

If you have any questions, contact: becomingyoutubestars@google.com

Sarah Stewart





Industry tips #5 – Voices of Africa mobile video journalism (part 2)

31 03 2011

By Dale Sean McEwan

Kampala: co-wives fight, public watches.

Kampala: man slips and dies.

Kampala: man punches wife live on mobile.

Voices of Africa





Industry tips #4 – Voices of Africa mobile video journalism (part 1)

30 03 2011

By Dale Sean McEwan

Voices of Africa.

Video: man batters wife live on mobile.

Voices of Africa mobile reporters currently under training.

In mobile phone journalism, Africa is ahead of the west (Guardian article).

Voices of Africa

 





VJ on the road – are you as prepared as UNICEF?

30 03 2011

By Richard Dodwell

You never know what you may find while driving down the road.

The unexpected is often what makes the best video journalism stand out from the crowd – that fresh insight into a familiar story.

Charities, production companies and news organisations are all taught how best to prepare themselves and save time on uploading footage – but who better to learn from – particularly in developing countries – than UNICEF.

Here we include some of the helpful guidance from Bob Coen, a video producer and global correspondent at UNICEF, the agency of the United Nations which upholds the rights of children around the world.

From auscamonline.com:

“I work as a ‘one-man-band’ – shooting, writing, editing, and transmitting my stories on the road via FTP to UNICEF headquarters. The videos are also made available to international broadcasters and news organizations through UNIFEED, the daily satellite news feed from United Nations Headquarters in New York,” Bob commented. “So, the quick turnaround of broadcast quality video from remote and difficult locations is an essential part of what I do.”

“I shoot primarily to AVCHD files with a Panasonic Lumix HDSLR camera and edit on a MacBook Pro running Final Cut Pro and Compressor. Most of the time I need to turn around stories quickly, in challenging conditions further complicated by a multi-step post-production workflow and very slow Internet connections in the places I work. Using the Matrox MXO2 Mini with MAX technology helps me save precious time producing my broadcast-quality H.264 encodes.”

“In 2010 I made several trips to cover humanitarian disasters, including the famine in Niger as well as the post-earthquake recovery and the cholera epidemic in Haiti. The unit was especially useful during my most recent trip to Haiti in late 2010. I was typically working 18 to 20 hour days – shooting all day, then spending long hours at night, editing, encoding, and transmitting. Using MXO2 Mini with MAX cut my H.264 encode times by up to 90% compared to when I previously used either Compressor or QuickTime to do it. I was assured of quick, high-quality encodes that also allowed me several extra hours of precious sleep!”

Read the full article here.





Industry tips #3 – A24 Media Q&A (part 2)

30 03 2011

By Dale Sean McEwan

Here’s another link to A24 Media.

Salim Amin, founder of A24 Media (Picture courtesy of Guardian.co.uk)